Skip to content

On Veterans Day We Honor our Military

“We remember those who were called upon to give all a person can give, and we remember those who were prepared to make that sacrifice if it were demanded of them in the line of duty, though it never was. Most of all, we remember the devotion and gallantry with which all of them ennobled their nation as they became champions of a noble cause.” – Ronald Reagan

The History of Veterans Day

Although the signing of the Treaty of Versailles officially ended World War I on June 28, 1919, the fighting ceased several months prior to that, when an armistice between the Allies and Germany went into effect at the 11th hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month, on November 11, 1918.

In November 1919, President Wilson proclaimed November 11th as Armistice Day, a day to honor those who served in World War I. However, with the greatest mobilization of Armed Forces during World War II, and millions more serving in the Korean War, Veterans’ service organizations lobbied for a change. In 1954 Congress approved the recommendation and replaced the world “Armistice” with “Veterans.” On June 1, 1954, November 11 was proclaimed Veterans Day, a day to honor American veterans of all wars for their patriotism and bravery in serving our country.

How Our Country Celebrates

Each year the Veterans Day National Ceremony is held at Arlington National Cemetery. At exactly 11:00 am, a wreath is placed at the Tomb of the Unknowns, and is followed by a parade of colors and speeches. Throughout the country, Veterans march in parades, and ceremonies take place in both small towns and large cities.

Interesting Facts About Veterans and Veterans Day

  • In 1968, Congress passed the Uniform Holiday Bill, changing the date of Veterans Day to the fourth Monday of October beginning in 1971. However, because of the significance of the date, Veterans Day was moved back to November 11 in 1978.
  • Several other countries honor their World War I and World War II Veterans each year. Britain celebrates Remembrance Day on the second Sunday of November, while Canada honors their Veterans on Remembrance Day on November 11. France and Australia also commemorate their Veterans around the 11th of November.
  • According to recent statistics, there are 18.5 million US Veterans. 9.2 million of those Veterans are over the age of 65.
  • There are only three states that are home to more than 1 million Veterans: California (1.8 million); Florida (1.5 million); Texas (1.7 million).
  • An American soldier was buried at Arlington National Cemetery on November 11, 1921. As his identity was unknown, his gravesite is known as the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. On each Veterans Day, a wreath is placed on his grave by the President or a high-ranking government member.
  • Veterans Day is occasionally misspelled. It does not include an apostrophe because it is not a day that belongs to veterans but a day that honors veterans.

Veterans Commemoratives is proud to honor our Veterans and to thank them for their services to our country. On November 11, please join us in celebrating our Veterans and letting them know that we appreciate their bravery and their patriotism in order to keep our country safe. Thank you.

Advertisements

Honoring Our Military Families

“The day you married a service member is the day you joined the military.”

November is a time of thanks. Later this month many of us will gather with family and friends to watch football games or a parade, and to celebrate Thanksgiving. But this year remember to also give thanks to the families of our military.

First celebrated in 1993, November was chosen as Family Military Appreciation Month. The following year President Clinton issued a proclamation establishing National Military Families Recognition Day. Subsequent presidents also issued proclamations, and Congress passed a resolution designating the entire month as Military Family Month. During the month of November, the families are honored and recognized for their commitment, sacrifice and support of the military.

Although family members may not wear a uniform of the armed forces, they are supporting their family – whether it’s a son or daughter, husband or wife, sister or brother – as they serve their country. Hundreds of thousands of troops are deployed overseas. It is important to recognize not only those individuals, but the families who are making daily sacrifices while their loved ones are bravely serving our nation. While they are in combat and keeping our nation safe, they are often missing holidays, birthdays, and important family events.

On Friday, November 11th and Saturday November 12th there will be many official ceremonials marking “Veterans Day 2017” in thousands of communities, small and large, throughout America.

Veterans Commemoratives is proud to honor our military families. Please join us in showing your gratitude to military families, each and every day, and letting them know of your support as their loved ones serve in the U.S. Armed Forces. Thank you.

“VETERANS COMMEMORATIVES: A DAY IN HISTORY” – The U.S. Navy Turns 242 on October 13

“I can imagine no more rewarding a career. And any man who may be asked in this century what he did to make his life worthwhile, I think can respond with a good deal of pride and satisfaction: ‘I served in the United States Navy.'” – John F. Kennedy

On October 13, 1775, the Second Continental Congress passed a resolution creating the Continental Navy. It was during the American Revolution when the Continental Congress purchased and converted a fleet of small ships. Their purpose was not to control the seas against the British, but to intercept the vessels that were carrying supplies to the British army in the U.S.

After the war ended the Navy was disbanded. However, with trade expanding in the late 1790s, and threats of further attacks by pirates, George Washington established the Naval Act of 1794, creating a permanent U.S. Navy. As part of the act, six warships were authorized. While the original Continental Navy had been disbanded, October 13 is still considered the official birthday of the United States Navy.

The Navy has played an important role during the history of the United States. During the Civil War, the Navy blockaded Confederate armies and seized control of the Southern rivers. Although many of the ships were outdated in the 1880s, Congress approved building new battleships toward the end of the 19th century. After winning two major battles during the Spanish-American War, the Navy continued to build more ships. By the end of World War I, the U.S. Navy had more men and women than the Royal Navy.

The Navy built several more aircraft carriers and battleships prior to World War II and finally entered the war after Japan attacked Pearl Harbor. The U.S. Navy played a major role during the remainder of World War II and the defeat of Japan, including the Battle of Midway. At that time, there were more than 1,600 warships in the Navy.

More recently, the Navy participated in the Korean War, Vietnam War and Gulf War. After the fall of the Soviet Union, the U.S. Navy was considered the undisputed naval superpower. With more than 300,000 personnel on active duty and 100,000 in the Naval Reserve, today’s U.S. Navy remains an impressive presence throughout the world.

Veterans Commemoratives (vetcom.com) celebrates the 242nd Anniversary of the U.S. Navy, and proudly honors veterans who have served in the United States Military.

  • U.S. NAVY CAREER SERVICE RINGS: Handcrafted in America our Career Service Ring features a sculpted Navy Service emblem and Career Insignia. Each ring is created with a combination of Gold and Silver, personal birthstones, and your engraved initials and years of service.
  • U.S. NAVY DIAMOND & BIRTHSTONE SERVICE WATCHES: Each watch dial is minted like a coin, capturing every detail of your Service Branch emblem. The two-toned stainless steel dress bracelet is customized with personal monograms and brilliant birthstones above and below the dial. Other personalized options include Navy Career Emblems, and War Service Medals.
  • U.S. NAVY “NIGHT PATROL” TACTICAL BLACK WATCH: This unique watch features a large easy to read dial with your Service Emblem raised and polished above a black enamel background. The black case and strong PVC band complete the “Tactical” precision look as a tribute to your service to our country.
  • U.S. MILITARY MA-1 “BRAVO” JACKET: Comfort rated to NASA specs, our Bravo jacket is designed for three season wear. Available in gunmetal black or military sage green water-resistant polyester, each jacket is highly personalized with your service branch and optional War Service and American Flag patches.

Since 1987, Veterans Commemoratives has been providing customized military rings, watches, jackets and gift items to honor Military Veterans who have served in World War II, Korea, Vietnam, Afghanistan, Iraq and Desert Storm. For more information about our products, visit our website, www.vetcom.com.

“VETERANS COMMEMORATIVES: A DAY IN HISTORY” – Remembering Eddie Rickenbacker

Eddie Rickenbacker, born October 8, 1890 is considered America’s most successful fighter ace in World War I. A Medal of Honor recipient with 26 aerial victories, he is also considered to have won the most awards for valor by an American during World War I.

When Rickenbacker was 13, his father died and he left school to support his family. Always interested in machines and self-taught, he enrolled in a correspondence course in engineering eventually becoming a car salesman.

Prior to entering the War, Rickenbacker was a successful race car driver. Early in World War I, he wanted to join the Allied troops, however the U.S. had not yet entered the war. During these years he became acquainted with several aviators. One in particular was instrumental in his desire to become a pilot during the war.

It wasn’t until 1917 when the United States declared war on Germany, that he enlisted in the Army and began training in France with some of the first American soldiers. Most of the men who trained as pilots were college graduates. Because Rickenbacker lacked a college degree, he was assigned as an engineering officer with the U.S. Air Service’s training facility. During his free time he practiced flying and was eventually awarded a place in the 94th Aero Squadron.

On April 29, 1918 he shot down his first plane, and on May 28, after his fifth victory, he became an ace. Rickenbacker’s 26 victories was the American record until World War He flew 300 combat hours, more than any other U.S. pilot during World War I. When the Armistice was declared, he flew above to observe the ceasefire.

Rickenbacker was discharged in 1919, after being awarded the Distinguished Service Cross eight times. One of those awards was upgraded to the Medal of Honor. In addition, he was awarded the Legion of Honor and Croix de Guerre by France.

Although he was a celebrated pilot he chose to stay away from the limielight and turned down several movie offers. After the war, he went on a Liberty Bond tour and wrote about his memoir. In 1920 he founded the Rickenbacker Motor Company, incorporating features from racing cars. He later bought the Indianapolis Motor Speedway, which he closed during World War II because he didn’t want to waste gasoline, a valuable resource during the war. After being part of management for Eastern Air Transport, he merged Eastern with Florida Airways to form Eastern Airlines. When he discovered that General Motors was planning to sell Eastern, he purchased the company. He is credited with bringing faster airliners to Eastern Air Lines and promoting flying to the public.

In the mid 30’s Rickenbacker teamed up with an aviation artist and penned Ace Drummond, a comic strip series about the adventures of aviator Drummond. The successful comic strip later became a film series and radio program.

During World War II, Rickenbacker toured training bases and encouraged Americans to contribute to the war effort. He also pledged his airlines equipment and staff.

During his lifetime, Rickenbacker had more than one near-death experience. As a passenger traveling for business in 1941, his aircraft crashed near Atlanta. Gravely wounded, the press erroneously reported his death. The following year while he was touring air bases in the Pacific Theater, the B17 he was flying on went off course and was forced to ditch. For more than three weeks he and his fellow crewmen drifted at sea. Although one of his team didn’t survive the ordeal, the rest were rescued. Prior to them being found, the press once again reported his death.

Later in the war Rickenbacker traveled to the Soviet Union on a fact-finding mission. Because of previous conflicts he had with President Roosevelt, the War Department assisted him. Although he was successful in his mission and he was interviewed by Winston Churchill, Roosevelt did not meet with him.

Because of his efforts during the war, Rickenbacker was awarded the Medal for Merit, which is given to civilians for their service to the U.S. Government.

Rickenbacker resigned from his position of Chairman of the Board of Eastern Air Lines in 1963. He and his wife traveled extensively after his retirement and also became a public speaker. In 1967 he completed his autobiography. In 1977 Rickenbacker died, after suffering from a stroke and pneumonia. At that time, he was the last living Medal of Honor recipient of the Air Service, U.S. Army.

As we celebrate Eddie Rickenbacker, who was born 127 years ago on October 8, Veterans Commemoratives (vetcom.com) proudly honors veterans who have served our country.

  • US ARMY CAREER SERVICE RING: Handcrafted in America, this unique ring features your service branch emblem and your choice of career or service branch. Each ring is further personalized with your initials and years of service.
  • U.S. MILITARY “NIGHT PATROL” TACTICAL BLACK WATCH: The watch features a large easy-to-read dial with your Service Emblem raised and polished above a black enamel background. The black case and strong PVC band complete the “Tactical” precision look as a tribute to your service to our country.
  • U.S. MILITARY ELITE BOMBER JACKET: Inspired by the A-2 Military Bomber Jackets, this lighter weight jacket is made of fine, Napa leather. Personalized with your choice of a Service Branch emblem, as well as an optional War Patch and the American Flag, the Elite Bomber Jacket is a fitting tribute to those who served our country.

For more information about Veterans Commemorative products, visit our website, vetcom.com.

Don Malarkey, “Band of Brothers” Paratrooper, Dies At 96

An original “Screaming Eagle” of Easy Company during World War II, Malarkey was a decorated war hero.[Read More …]
http://blog.theveteranssite.com/don-malarkey-dies/

Call your members of Congress on October 12 in support of the Blue Water Navy Vietnam Veterans Act

Vietnam Veterans of America October 6, 2017 Legislative Update Save the Date: October 12, 2017 The next call in day on the hill supporting passage of H.R. 299 and S.422, the Blue Water Navy Vietnam Veterans Act 2017, is October 12 at 9:00 am. 304
https://vva.org/programs/agent-orange/call-your-members-of-congress-on-october-12-in-support-of-the-blue-water-navy-vietnam-veterans-act/

“VETERANS COMMEMORATIVES: A DAY IN HISTORY” – Remembering Eddie Rickenbacker

A Medal of Honor recipient with 26 aerial victories, he is also considered to have won the most awards for valor by an American during World War I. When Rickenbacker was 13, his father died and he left school to support his family. Always interested in machines and self-taught, he enrolled in a correspondence course in engineering eventually becoming a car salesman. Prior to entering the War, Rickenbacker was a successful race car driver. Early in World War I, he wanted to join the Allied troops, however the U.S. had not yet entered the war. During these years he became acquainted with several aviators. One in particular was instrumental in his desire to become a pilot during the war.
https://www.vetcom.com/blog/post/veterans-commemoratives-a-day-in-history-remembering-eddie-rickenbacker